Tag Archives: Arizona shooting

Sit together? Never!

In symbol of unity Sen. Mark Udall (D) is calling on members of Congress to all sit together for the State of the Union Address, set for January 25th.

Sit together?  SIT TOGETHER?

I am going to post a video of Ed Schultz, MSNBC, with the usual “vitriol” in his voice blasting and slamming republican congressmen for statements they made on gun control laws.  In another video, he is interviewing the HERO, Joe Zamudio, who took down the shooter in what in my opinion is a condescending manner.  In another video he is interviewing Dennis Kucinich. trying to demean and criticize republicans in general and in specific, House Speaker Boehner.  Mr. Kucinich, a democrat, even challenged him on it.

MSNBC is biased beyond belief, I don’t see that it has changed in tone or vitriol  since the shooting.

But SIT TOGETHER?  Should they hold hands, too?  Sing little songs and play pat-a-cake together?

We’re talking about running a government here, not trying to create a situation where it is not obvious just how FEW democrats there are in the House after the shallacking in November.  It is so easy to see what their motivation is.

So, I hear there are some republicans who are going along with this ridiculous suggestion.  I’m going to try to find out who they are and make a list.

Well, here’s two: .Kevin McCarthy, Republican, California, and Lisa Murkowski, Republican, Alaska (no surprise there).  Aaaaw, and McCarthy wants to sit next to Steny Hoyer.  1,2,3 sing:  Like a bridge over troubled waters…..

More:  Susan Collins, R, and Olympia Snowe, R.  (What a surprise that is! sarc)

And: Kelly Ayotte, R and I believe she was endorsed by Sarah Palin.

These are all senators.  There are none so far in the House to sign on.

Another one: John McCain, Republican, Arizona. (no surprise there either).

Have they gone mad?  NOW the democrats and the president want us all to be civil and everybody to “get along.”   They have not in any way set up an atmosphere to get along.

One thing is for sure, if you want everybody to be happy and nice and get along, you can start the conversation by saying you republicans, you tea party people, all you out there who disagree with us, you all had something to do with this murder in Tucson.  That’ll promote civility and dialogue every single time. It would be funny if it were not so serious.

This is Ed Schultz on Thursday, January 13th, demeaning Mr. Zamudio, a Hero who helped hold the shooter and likely prevented more deaths:

This is the full interview below. This interview was on January 10th.  So you can see what they did was cut the desired pieces to do the above video where Schultz dumped on the hero to make his point, knowing full well what he was doing.   Go to about 5:20 to hear the end of the interview – the part that was CUT OFF because Mr. Zamudio gave his opinion on gun control and it did not fit Mr. Schultz’ narrative and agenda.  This is a really good illustration of media malpractice and why they have no credibility whatsoever.


Here he is again “setting a good tone” blasting Palin and republicans.  Even Dennis Kucinich (D) about 5:23 takes Schultz to task for his comments.


All this MSNBC stuff is long and hard to listen to, but it shows exactly what they do.  It’s worth a listen for anyone who wants proof of the media bias and glaring hypocrisy.

Posted:  01.15.11


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Filed under politics

Transcript of Sarah Palin’s response

Sarah’s Palin’s response to the Arizona shooting and the media attacks.  Very presidential.

Like millions of Americans I learned of the tragic events in Arizona on Saturday, and my heart broke for the innocent victims. No words can fill the hole left by the death of an innocent, but we do mourn for the victims’ families as we express our sympathy.

I agree with the sentiments shared yesterday at the beautiful Catholic mass held in honor of the victims. The mass will hopefully help begin a healing process for the families touched by this tragedy and for our country.

Our exceptional nation, so vibrant with ideas and the passionate exchange and debate of ideas, is a light to the rest of the world. Congresswoman Giffords and her constituents were exercising their right to exchange ideas that day, to celebrate our Republic’s core values and peacefully assemble to petition our government. It’s inexcusable and incomprehensible why a single evil man took the lives of peaceful citizens that day.

There is a bittersweet irony that the strength of the American spirit shines brightest in times of tragedy. We saw that in Arizona. We saw the tenacity of those clinging to life, the compassion of those who kept the victims alive, and the heroism of those who overpowered a deranged gunman.

Like many, I’ve spent the past few days reflecting on what happened and praying for guidance. After this shocking tragedy, I listened at first puzzled, then with concern, and now with sadness, to the irresponsible statements from people attempting to apportion blame for this terrible event.

President Reagan said, “We must reject the idea that every time a law’s broken, society is guilty rather than the lawbreaker. It is time to restore the American precept that each individual is accountable for his actions.” Acts of monstrous criminality stand on their own. They begin and end with the criminals who commit them, not collectively with all the citizens of a state, not with those who listen to talk radio, not with maps of swing districts used by both sides of the aisle, not with law-abiding citizens who respectfully exercise their First Amendment rights at campaign rallies, not with those who proudly voted in the last election.

The last election was all about taking responsibility for our country’s future. President Obama and I may not agree on everything, but I know he would join me in affirming the health of our democratic process. Two years ago his party was victorious. Last November, the other party won. In both elections the will of the American people was heard, and the peaceful transition of power proved yet again the enduring strength of our Republic.

Vigorous and spirited public debates during elections are among our most cherished traditions.  And after the election, we shake hands and get back to work, and often both sides find common ground back in D.C. and elsewhere. If you don’t like a person’s vision for the country, you’re free to debate that vision. If you don’t like their ideas, you’re free to propose better ideas. But, especially within hours of a tragedy unfolding, journalists and pundits should not manufacture a blood libel that serves only to incite the very hatred and violence they purport to condemn. That is reprehensible.

There are those who claim political rhetoric is to blame for the despicable act of this deranged, apparently apolitical criminal. And they claim political debate has somehow gotten more heated just recently. But when was it less heated? Back in those “calm days” when political figures literally settled their differences with dueling pistols? In an ideal world all discourse would be civil and all disagreements cordial. But our Founding Fathers knew they weren’t designing a system for perfect men and women. If men and women were angels, there would be no need for government. Our Founders’ genius was to design a system that helped settle the inevitable conflicts caused by our imperfect passions in civil ways. So, we must condemn violence if our Republic is to endure.

As I said while campaigning for others last March in Arizona during a very heated primary race, “We know violence isn’t the answer. When we ‘take up our arms’, we’re talking about our vote.” Yes, our debates are full of passion, but we settle our political differences respectfully at the ballot box – as we did just two months ago, and as our Republic enables us to do again in the next election, and the next. That’s who we are as Americans and how we were meant to be. Public discourse and debate isn’t a sign of crisis, but of our enduring strength. It is part of why America is exceptional.

No one should be deterred from speaking up and speaking out in peaceful dissent, and we certainly must not be deterred by those who embrace evil and call it good. And we will not be stopped from celebrating the greatness of our country and our foundational freedoms by those who mock its greatness by being intolerant of differing opinion and seeking to muzzle dissent with shrill cries of imagined insults.

Just days before she was shot, Congresswoman Giffords read the First Amendment on the floor of the House. It was a beautiful moment and more than simply “symbolic,” as some claim, to have the Constitution read by our Congress. I am confident she knew that reading our sacred charter of liberty was more than just “symbolic.” But less than a week after Congresswoman Giffords reaffirmed our protected freedoms, another member of Congress announced that he would propose a law that would criminalize speech he found offensive.

It is in the hour when our values are challenged that we must remain resolved to protect those values. Recall how the events of 9-11 challenged our values and we had to fight the tendency to trade our freedoms for perceived security. And so it is today.

Let us honor those precious lives cut short in Tucson by praying for them and their families and by cherishing their memories. Let us pray for the full recovery of the wounded. And let us pray for our country. In times like this we need God’s guidance and the peace He provides. We need strength to not let the random acts of a criminal turn us against ourselves, or weaken our solid foundation, or provide a pretext to stifle debate.

America must be stronger than the evil we saw displayed last week. We are better than the mindless finger-pointing we endured in the wake of the tragedy. We will come out of this stronger and more united in our desire to peacefully engage in the great debates of our time, to respectfully embrace our differences in a positive manner, and to unite in the knowledge that, though our ideas may be different, we must all strive for a better future for our country. May God bless America.

Posted:  01.12.11

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Filed under Human Interest, politics, Sarah Palin, Uncategorized